jo-calls-crows:

love at first sight with Trite planiceps

(via scientificillustration)

nevver:

Face in the crowd, John Hallmén
nevver:

Face in the crowd, John Hallmén
nevver:

Face in the crowd, John Hallmén
nevver:

Face in the crowd, John Hallmén
nevver:

Face in the crowd, John Hallmén
nevver:

Face in the crowd, John Hallmén
xerui:

Olimpia Zagnoli
“There remains an uneasiness with discussing American racism alongside the myth of American exceptionalism, because the myth is easier to digest. We continue to be asked to stop. We continue to be told we’ve won enough.

Emancipation was supposed to be enough. ‘Separate but equal’ was supposed to be enough. Brown v. Board of Education was supposed to be enough. The Civil Rights/Voting Acts were supposed to be enough. Affirmative action was supposed to be enough. A black president is supposed to be enough. Yet, here we are, facing mass incarceration, food insecurity, chronic unemployment, the erosion of the social safety net, income inequality, housing discrimination, police brutality and the seemingly unending deaths of our young people at the hands of police and armed vigilantes. Pardon the ‘profound gloom.’

What some call depression or pessimism, I would call impatience and rage. Our impatience and rage is what has produced progress. That we are still impatient and angry reflects not black people’s failing but how far America still has to go. My question/challenge to white people who claim to be on the side of equality and justice: when will you get just as angry that these things have been done in your name?”
— Mychal Denzel Smith, "The Function of Black Rage" (via ethiopienne)

(via rhamphotheca)

christinamakes:

Desk wip of collaboration drawing with Caitlin Hackett for the tooth and nail show at Antler Gallery in Portland, opening March 27!

ejlandsman:

So! This has been done for a while, but I never posted the final. This is Melati, a 43-year-old orangutan living at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. I had a great time drawing them! Apparently they love to watch people draw--Melati came and sat on a ledge just above me and watched very intently while I sketched her and snapped some pictures. Another female, Chinta, noticed and came over to sit down right in front of me. They were both interested in my drawings, but didn’t much care for the camera. A couple times Chinta even whacked the glass lightly with her knuckles when I stopped drawing to take photos.  
I’ve only experimented a bit with scratchboard; this is my first full illustration using it.  I like the effect a lot, but it’s kind of a trip to have to keep reminding myself that to make shadows and dark areas work I have to leave them alone.  That and knowing that every mark I make is indelible. o_o
ejlandsman:

So! This has been done for a while, but I never posted the final. This is Melati, a 43-year-old orangutan living at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. I had a great time drawing them! Apparently they love to watch people draw--Melati came and sat on a ledge just above me and watched very intently while I sketched her and snapped some pictures. Another female, Chinta, noticed and came over to sit down right in front of me. They were both interested in my drawings, but didn’t much care for the camera. A couple times Chinta even whacked the glass lightly with her knuckles when I stopped drawing to take photos.  
I’ve only experimented a bit with scratchboard; this is my first full illustration using it.  I like the effect a lot, but it’s kind of a trip to have to keep reminding myself that to make shadows and dark areas work I have to leave them alone.  That and knowing that every mark I make is indelible. o_o
ejlandsman:

So! This has been done for a while, but I never posted the final. This is Melati, a 43-year-old orangutan living at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. I had a great time drawing them! Apparently they love to watch people draw--Melati came and sat on a ledge just above me and watched very intently while I sketched her and snapped some pictures. Another female, Chinta, noticed and came over to sit down right in front of me. They were both interested in my drawings, but didn’t much care for the camera. A couple times Chinta even whacked the glass lightly with her knuckles when I stopped drawing to take photos.  
I’ve only experimented a bit with scratchboard; this is my first full illustration using it.  I like the effect a lot, but it’s kind of a trip to have to keep reminding myself that to make shadows and dark areas work I have to leave them alone.  That and knowing that every mark I make is indelible. o_o
ejlandsman:

So! This has been done for a while, but I never posted the final. This is Melati, a 43-year-old orangutan living at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. I had a great time drawing them! Apparently they love to watch people draw--Melati came and sat on a ledge just above me and watched very intently while I sketched her and snapped some pictures. Another female, Chinta, noticed and came over to sit down right in front of me. They were both interested in my drawings, but didn’t much care for the camera. A couple times Chinta even whacked the glass lightly with her knuckles when I stopped drawing to take photos.  
I’ve only experimented a bit with scratchboard; this is my first full illustration using it.  I like the effect a lot, but it’s kind of a trip to have to keep reminding myself that to make shadows and dark areas work I have to leave them alone.  That and knowing that every mark I make is indelible. o_o

ejlandsman:

So! This has been done for a while, but I never posted the final. This is Melati, a 43-year-old orangutan living at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. I had a great time drawing them! Apparently they love to watch people draw--Melati came and sat on a ledge just above me and watched very intently while I sketched her and snapped some pictures. Another female, Chinta, noticed and came over to sit down right in front of me. They were both interested in my drawings, but didn’t much care for the camera. A couple times Chinta even whacked the glass lightly with her knuckles when I stopped drawing to take photos.  

I’ve only experimented a bit with scratchboard; this is my first full illustration using it.  I like the effect a lot, but it’s kind of a trip to have to keep reminding myself that to make shadows and dark areas work I have to leave them alone.  That and knowing that every mark I make is indelible. o_o

(via scientificillustration)

madaboutbike:

national geographic, 1973
talikira:

Wolf Spiders!
talikira:

Wolf Spiders!
talikira:

Wolf Spiders!
theolduvaigorge:

Sculpting Science
by  Alexa Lim, Associate Producer

"Who were our first ancestors? What does it mean to be human? These are questions artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts have been working to answer. They describe their collaborations on the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins exhibit and discuss how art and science inform one another."

Click through for audio: Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science. 
***Very interesting interview.
(Source: Science Friday)
theolduvaigorge:

Sculpting Science
by  Alexa Lim, Associate Producer

"Who were our first ancestors? What does it mean to be human? These are questions artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts have been working to answer. They describe their collaborations on the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins exhibit and discuss how art and science inform one another."

Click through for audio: Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science. 
***Very interesting interview.
(Source: Science Friday)
theolduvaigorge:

Sculpting Science
by  Alexa Lim, Associate Producer

"Who were our first ancestors? What does it mean to be human? These are questions artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts have been working to answer. They describe their collaborations on the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins exhibit and discuss how art and science inform one another."

Click through for audio: Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science. 
***Very interesting interview.
(Source: Science Friday)
theolduvaigorge:

Sculpting Science
by  Alexa Lim, Associate Producer

"Who were our first ancestors? What does it mean to be human? These are questions artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts have been working to answer. They describe their collaborations on the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins exhibit and discuss how art and science inform one another."

Click through for audio: Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science. 
***Very interesting interview.
(Source: Science Friday)
theolduvaigorge:

Sculpting Science
by  Alexa Lim, Associate Producer

"Who were our first ancestors? What does it mean to be human? These are questions artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts have been working to answer. They describe their collaborations on the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins exhibit and discuss how art and science inform one another."

Click through for audio: Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science. 
***Very interesting interview.
(Source: Science Friday)
theolduvaigorge:

Sculpting Science
by  Alexa Lim, Associate Producer

"Who were our first ancestors? What does it mean to be human? These are questions artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts have been working to answer. They describe their collaborations on the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins exhibit and discuss how art and science inform one another."

Click through for audio: Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science. 
***Very interesting interview.
(Source: Science Friday)
theolduvaigorge:

Sculpting Science
by  Alexa Lim, Associate Producer

"Who were our first ancestors? What does it mean to be human? These are questions artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts have been working to answer. They describe their collaborations on the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins exhibit and discuss how art and science inform one another."

Click through for audio: Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science. 
***Very interesting interview.
(Source: Science Friday)

theolduvaigorge:

Sculpting Science

  • by  Alexa Lim, Associate Producer

"Who were our first ancestors? What does it mean to be human? These are questions artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts have been working to answer. They describe their collaborations on the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins exhibit and discuss how art and science inform one another."

Click through for audio: Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science

***Very interesting interview.

(Source: Science Friday)

(via scientificillustration)

yuri-rimsky:

Icons of the Raising of St Lazarus
yuri-rimsky:

Icons of the Raising of St Lazarus
yuri-rimsky:

Icons of the Raising of St Lazarus

yuri-rimsky:

Icons of the Raising of St Lazarus

(via allmystrings)

paleoillustration:

Prehistoric giraffes by Willem van der Merwe
paleoillustration:

Prehistoric giraffes by Willem van der Merwe
paleoillustration:

Prehistoric giraffes by Willem van der Merwe
nickdrake:

Colin Harrison - Nests, Eggs and Nestlings
nickdrake:

Colin Harrison - Nests, Eggs and Nestlings
nickdrake:

Colin Harrison - Nests, Eggs and Nestlings
nickdrake:

Colin Harrison - Nests, Eggs and Nestlings
nickdrake:

Colin Harrison - Nests, Eggs and Nestlings
nickdrake:

Colin Harrison - Nests, Eggs and Nestlings
nickdrake:

Colin Harrison - Nests, Eggs and Nestlings

nickdrake:

Colin Harrison - Nests, Eggs and Nestlings

(via freshphotons)